Need a Good Book to Read?

At North View Middle School we believe that our students education does not end when the school bell rings. Because of this belief, I would like to use this post to recommend books for your middle level learner to engage with at home. Please read the information provided by Allison Sirovy, an 8th grade English teacher at North View Middle School, below to put a great book in your students hands.


 Knowledge Is Power

“The best advice I ever got was that knowledge is power and to keep reading.”
~ David Bailey, English photographer
I don’t know about you, but our country’s politics make me feel anxious and sad every day – not for me but my students. My students are the most amazing 8th graders, and they rise up to my high expectations day in and day out. Yet . . . many of my students have obstacles that they are trying to overcome: poverty, homelessness, racial inequities, religious discrimination, sexual orientation discrimination, immigration issues, parental incarceration . . . The list could go on and on, and still my students come to school because they know that “knowledge is power.”
Some days, I wonder if I truly am helping my students. There is so much hate in our country right now. Too many Americans look down on my students because of their race, social economic status, religion, and so on. Is the fact that I show up to school every day going to make a difference in my students’ lives? I have hope that I do make a difference.
My main focus is helping the kids to understand that reading and writing gives them power – power to beat the system and power to be who they want to be. My students are reading books with characters like them (mirrors) and reading books about characters not like them (windows). With all of this reading, my students are able to see our country and the world from multiple perspectives, which gives them power – power to help make the world a better place.
Because I have such a diverse group of students, I read quite diverse books. I love middle grade and young adult novels because I feel more connected to my students that way and I can help my students find books that speak to them.
I have to give a quick shout-out to our amazing Media Center Specialist, Anna Teeple, because she has a way with helping our most “still developing” readers find books they love! It’s a team effort at our school, and I appreciate all of her support with our students. Thanks, Anna!
Now, on to the books I have read recently that I hope you will enjoy as well . . .
Posted by John David Anderson 
 
This is a must-read for all middle school students, parents of middle school students, teachers, administrators, counselors, you name it. It delves into the topic of how words really do hurt and how we treat others. I plan on using this for a read-aloud in my Advisory class soon. This book will definitely make for good classroom conversations.
Goodreads blurb: In middle school, words aren’t just words. They can be weapons. They can be gifts. The right words can win you friends or make you enemies. They can come back to haunt you. Sometimes they can change things forever.


When cell phones are banned at Branton Middle School, Frost and his friends Deedee, Wolf, and Bench come up with a new way to communicate: leaving sticky notes for each other all around the school. It catches on, and soon all the kids in school are leaving notes—though for every kind and friendly one, there is a cutting and cruel one as well.

In the middle of this, a new girl named Rose arrives at school and sits at Frost’s lunch table. Rose is not like anyone else at Branton Middle School, and it’s clear that the close circle of friends Frost has made for himself won’t easily hold another. As the sticky-note war escalates, and the pressure to choose sides mounts, Frost soon realizes that after this year, nothing will ever be the same.

Akata Warrior (Akata Witch series, book #2) by Nnedi Okorafor 

 If you are into fantasy books, this is the series for you. I enjoyed the first book Akata Witch and enjoyed the second book in the series as well. It’s great to have books to share with my students that take place in other countries, and this book takes place in Nigeria, from which I have several students. It’s a fun, fast-paced, and intense book that gives the reader a different view of the world.

Goodreads blurb: A year ago, Sunny Nwazue, an American-born girl Nigerian girl, was inducted into the secret Leopard Society. As she began to develop her magical powers, Sunny learned that she had been chosen to lead a dangerous mission to avert an apocalypse, brought about by the terrifying masquerade, Ekwensu. Now, stronger, feistier, and a bit older, Sunny is studying with her mentor Sugar Cream and struggling to unlock the secrets in her strange Nsibidi book.

Eventually, Sunny knows she must confront her destiny. With the support of her Leopard Society friends, Orlu, Chichi, and Sasha, and of her spirit face, Anyanwu, she will travel through worlds both visible and invisible to the mysteries town of Osisi, where she will fight a climactic battle to save humanity.

Much-honored Nnedi Okorafor, winner of the Hugo, Nebula, and World Fantasy awards, merges today’s Nigeria with a unique world she creates. Akata Warrior blends mythology, fantasy, history and magic into a compelling tale that will keep readers spellbound.

Alex, Approximately by Jenn Bennett
 
I didn’t start out loving this book. I didn’t like the main character because I felt she was the stereotypical, upper-middle class white girl with typical problems. She seemed standoffish to me and a little self-centered, but . . . about forty to fifty pages in I had to check myself. I was being critical of a character because of my preconceived notions – exactly what I tell my own children and my students not to do because people are dealing with issues that are usually hidden. The main character, Bailey, is dealing with problems, and I shouldn’t have judged. Well, I loved this book! It reminded me that books give us knowledge and help us to be more empathetic, which is what I obviously needed.
 
Goodreads blurb: The one guy Bailey Rydell can’t stand is actually the boy of her dreams—she just doesn’t know it yet.

Classic movie fan Bailey “Mink” Rydell has spent months crushing on a witty film geek she only knows online as Alex. Two coasts separate the teens until Bailey moves in with her dad, who lives in the same California surfing town as her online crush.

Faced with doubts (what if he’s a creep in real life—or worse?), Bailey doesn’t tell Alex she’s moved to his hometown. Or that she’s landed a job at the local tourist-trap museum. Or that she’s being heckled daily by the irritatingly hot museum security guard, Porter Roth—a.k.a. her new archnemesis. But life is a whole lot messier than the movies, especially when Bailey discovers that tricky fine line between hate, love, and whatever it is she’s starting to feel for Porter.

And as the summer months go by, Bailey must choose whether to cling to a dreamy online fantasy in Alex or take a risk on an imperfect reality with Porter. The choice is both simpler and more complicated than she realizes, because Porter Roth is hiding a secret of his own: Porter is Alex…Approximately.

 

Turtles All the Way Down by John Green 

 

 
Author John Green has the ability to take the lives and emotions of teenagers and turn them into books that everyone loves. Now, I know John Green is famous for his novel The Fault in Our Stars, but that wasn’t my favorite books of his. I love his many other books that feature quirky teenage characters from all walks of life.Turtles All the Way Down doesn’t disappoint. Aza, Daisy, and Davis are truly likable characters, each dealing with their individual problems.

Goodreads blurb: Sixteen-year-old Aza never intended to pursue the mystery of fugitive billionaire Russell Pickett, but there’s a hundred-thousand-dollar reward at stake and her Best and Most Fearless Friend, Daisy, is eager to investigate. So together, they navigate the short distance and broad divides that separate them from Russell Pickett’s son, Davis.

Aza is trying. She is trying to be a good daughter, a good friend, a good student, and maybe even a good detective, while also living within the ever-tightening spiral of her own thoughts.

In his long-awaited return, John Green, the acclaimed, award-winning author of Looking for Alaska and The Fault in Our Stars, shares Aza’s story with shattering, unflinching clarity in this brilliant novel of love, resilience, and the power of lifelong friendship.

 You can learn more about great books for middle school students and connect with Alison Sirovy here.

If you have any questions about this or anything else related to North View Middle School please connect with me here or follow me at @NVMSPrincipal.

Need a Good Book to Read?

At North View Middle School we believe that our students education does not end when the school bell rings. Because of this belief, I would like to use this post to recommend books for your middle level learner to engage with at home. Please read the information provided by Allison Sirovy, an 8th grade English teacher at North View Middle School, below to put a great book in your students hands.


 New experiences . . . all from my living room couch

 I apologize for not writing on this blog for a few weeks, but I’ve been hooked on reading so many great books (and teaching 8th grade English)! In looking over my most recent reads, I’ve read books ranging from a Native American childhood in the Southwest to an Egyptian girl, who was sold as a slave at eight years old to a wealthy family.

These books have made me cry, have made me laugh, and have made me think about how lucky I am to live the life I live. Reading lets me experience the lives of others without ever leaving my couch, and I am so thankful that middle school students and high school students have a multitude of fabulous books by fabulous authors to chose from. Here are the four books I have read in the past four weeks:

Rattlesnake Mesa: Stories from a Native American Childhood by Ednah New Rider Weber

I’ll be honest; I usually judge a book by it’s cover. That’s terrible – I know, especially since I’m an English teacher, and this book had sat in my closet for over a year because I didn’t like the cover. Well, I finally decided to read it, and I wonder why I waited so long. It was an eye-opening book. The author, Ednah New Rider Weber, shares brief stories about her childhood – about her friends and family and her times at an Indian boarding school, which she, along with thousands of other Native children, were forced to attend by our government in the late 1800s and early 1900s. Ms. New Rider Weber has a way of telling each story with heart yet at the same time making each story brief, so she can share as many of her wonderful (and heartbreaking) stories as possible.

Goodreads blurb (a really quirk blurb that doesn’t do the book justice): EdNah, a seven-year-old Pawnee girl, goes to live with a father she hardly knows on a Navajo reservation after her grandmother dies.

Piecing Me Together by Renee Watson


Just read this book! That’s all I need to say.

Goodreads blurb: Jade believes she must get out of her neighborhood if she’s ever going to succeed. Her mother says she has to take every opportunity. She has. She accepted a scholarship to a mostly-white private school and even Saturday morning test prep opportunities. But some opportunities feel more demeaning than helpful. Like an invitation to join Women to Women, a mentorship program for “at-risk” girls. Except really, it’s for black girls. From “bad” neighborhoods.

But Jade doesn’t need support. And just because her mentor is black doesn’t mean she understands Jade. And maybe there are some things Jade could show these successful women about the real world and finding ways to make a real difference.

Friendships, race, privilege, identity—this compelling and thoughtful story explores the issues young women face.

Hidden Girl: The True Story of a Modern-Day Child Slave by Shyima Hall
 
Recently and over the past several months, there have been news stories about human trafficking in the United States and across the globe, but it never really dawned on me what was truly happening to these children, teens, and adults who were sold into slavery or captured into slavery. Shyima Hall’s story begins in Egypt where she is a happy child even though she lives in abject poverty. At eight years old, she is sold by her parents to a wealthy family in Egypt; this family eventually leaves Egypt and takes Shyima with them to the United States to be their slave from before sun-up to well after sundown. There is a happy ending to this real-life story, but that happiness comes slowly to Shyima.
Goodreads blurb: Shyima Hall was born in Egypt on September 29, 1989, the seventh child of desperately poor parents. When she was eight, her parents sold her into slavery. Shyima then moved two hours away to Egypt’s capitol city of Cairo to live with a wealthy family and serve them eighteen hours a day, seven days a week. When she was ten, her captors moved to Orange County, California, and smuggled Shyima with them. Two years later, an anonymous call from a neighbor brought about the end of Shyima’s servitude—but her journey to true freedom was far from over.

A volunteer at her local police department since she was a teenager, Shyima is passionate about helping to rescue others who are in bondage. Now a US citizen, she regularly speaks out about human trafficking and intends to one day become an immigration officer. In Hidden Girl, Shyima candidly reveals how she overcame her harrowing circumstances and brings vital awareness to a timely and relevant topic.

Patina (Track series, #2) by Jason Reynolds
 
If you’ve never read a book by Jason Reynolds, I highly recommend everything he has written! Reynolds has a way of getting to the heart of the characters in his story and making his readers want to finish one of his books in one sitting.

Patina is another one of these books. It is the second book in his Track series. (Ghost was the first one in the series, which

I also highly recommend.) Patina, a.k.a. Patty, will have you cheering her on as she deals with her mom’s illness, her new school, and doing her best to take care of everyone around her, including her younger sister, Maddy.

Goodreads blurb: Patina, or Patty, runs like a flash. She runs for many reasons—to escape the taunts from the kids at the fancy-schmancy new school she’s been sent to since she and her little sister had to stop living with their mom. She runs from the reason WHY she’s not able to live with her “real” mom any more: her mom has The Sugar, and Patty is terrified that the disease that took her mom’s legs will one day take her away forever. So Patty’s also running for her mom, who can’t. But can you ever really run away from any of this? As the stress builds up, it’s building up a pretty bad attitude as well. Coach won’t tolerate bad attitude. No day, no way. And now he wants Patty to run relay…where you have to depend on other people? How’s she going to do THAT?

You can learn more about great books for middle school students and connect with Alison Sirovy here.

Pic of the Day: Literacy O’ Lantern


At North View Middle School we recognize the fundamental importance of literacy to expanding life opportunities for our students. As a result of this understanding, we work diligently to ensure that literacy is alive in our building and in our student’s lives inside and outside of the school day. Because of this belief, we make every attempt to get students and their families engaged in our literacy engagement opportunities. 

This year for example, our school hosted our first “Literacy-O-Lanternsevent in our Media Center for students and their families to enjoy during parent-teacher conferences last night. Armed with Sharpies and a pumpkin, hand picked by one of our Reading Teachers, they were able to decorate the pumpkins with characters from a children’s book or their imagination. This year’s event will conclude with an opportunity for our students to continue their work after school on Tuesday. 

Our ultimate goal is to foster a genuine love of reading within our school communities, and to get kids talking about their favorite books. Our hope is that events like these will provide them with an opportunity to become avid readers. 

If you have any questions about this or anything else related to North View Middle School please connect with me here or follow me at @NVMSPrincipal.

Fantabulous Summer Reads!

At North View Middle School we believe that our students education does not end when the school bell rings. Because of this belief, I would like to use this post to recommend books for your middle level learner to engage with over the summer. Please read the information provided by Allison Sirovy, an 8th grade English teacher at North View Middle School, below to put a great book in your students hands.


Hello!

We are about halfway through our summer vacation here in Minnesota, so it’s time to share what I’ve been up to with my reading life! The books are listed in order from most recently finished to least recently finished.

Akata Witch by Nnedi Okorafor

First off, let me say that I am not a fan of fantasy. My 14 year old daughter loves fantasy books.  Me? Not so much, so I was hesitant to pick up this book and start reading it even though I purchased it at our local book store (Buffalo Books and Coffee in case you are interested!  Also, support your own local and independent book stores!)  Anyway, the book hooked me from the very beginning with a wonderful and true main character – Sunny – her companions (Orlu, Chichi, and Sasha), her teacher Anatov, and her mentor Sugar Cream (gained her name from a childhood peculiarity).  I also loved the fact that it took place in Nigeria, and, at times, would give a different perspective of America, which we Americans need at times. Plus, it’s book 1 of a series. The second book comes out in October, which I will definitely be buying!
Author Nnedi Okorafor

Here is the Goodreads summary of the book:

Akata Witch transports the reader to a magical place where nothing is quite as it seems. Born in New York, but living in Aba, Nigeria, twelve-year old Sunny is understandably a little lost. She is albino and thus, incredibly sensitive to the sun. All Sunny wants to do is be able to play football and get through another day of school without being bullied. But once she befriends Orlu and Chichi, Sunny is plunged in to the world of the Leopard People, where your worst defect becomes your greatest asset. Together, Sunny, Orlu, Chichi and Sasha form the youngest ever Oha Coven. Their mission is to track down Black Hat Otokoto, the man responsible for kidnapping and maiming children. Will Sunny be able to overcome the killer with powers stronger than her own, or will the future she saw in the flames become reality?

The Inexplicable Logic of my Life by Benjamin Alire Sáenz
 
Ooooohhhhh, I loved this book!!  For some reason, I have a difficult time choosing books with a male main character.  Books with female main characters usually speak to me, but this book with a male main character is AMAZING!!  I loved Sal – Salvador! He is a real American teenage boy, not the stereotypical American teenage boy we see on television and social media, but a boy who is confused about what his life holds, tries his best, is a good friend and son, and has a good heart.  I loved this book for the fact that what we see on the outside isn’t necessarily what’s inside a person.
Goodreads summary: 
 
The first day of senior year:


Everything is about to change. Until this moment, Sal has always been certain of his place with his adoptive gay father and their loving Mexican-American family. But now his own history unexpectedly haunts him, and life-altering events force him and his best friend, Samantha, to confront issues of faith, loss, and grief.

Suddenly Sal is throwing punches, questioning everything, and discovering that he no longer knows who he really is—but if Sal’s not who he thought he was, who is he?

Flying Lesson and Other Stories, edited by Ellen Oh
 
This book is a collection of short stories written by famous authors like Kwame Alexander (The Crossover) and Meg Medina (Yaqui Delgado Wants to Kick Your Ass). Ellen Oh, the editor of this book, founded We Need Diverse Books, and this is one of her projects to get books written by diverse authors into the hands of children and teens.  If you don’t like sitting down and reading a whole book with one story at a time, you can read this book story by story.  I promise – you won’t be disappointed!
Summary from Goodreads: 
Whether it is basketball dreams, family fiascos, first crushes, or new neighborhoods, this bold anthology—written by the best children’s authors—celebrates the uniqueness and universality in all of us.

In a partnership with We Need Diverse Books, industry giants Kwame Alexander, Soman Chainani, Matt de la Peña, Tim Federle, Grace Lin, Meg Medina, Walter Dean Myers, Tim Tingle, and Jacqueline Woodson join newcomer Kelly J. Baptist in a story collection that is as humorous as it is heartfelt. This impressive group of authors has earned among them every major award in children’s publishing and popularity as New York Times bestsellers.

From these distinguished authors come ten distinct and vibrant stories.

The Girl Who Drank the Moon by Kelly Barnhill(who by the way lives in Minneapolis and whose daughter attended South High School by Lake Street in Minneapolis – support your local authors!)
This book is a beautiful story, written in beautiful language, with beautiful characters.  I could not put this book down, but I had to because I wanted the book to last forever. It didn’t last forever, and that breaks my heart. I want the story to continue . . . I’m not going to say much about this book except you won’t want to put it down. It will captivate you!
Goodreads summary: 
Every year, the people of the Protectorate leave a baby as an offering to the witch who lives in the forest. They hope this sacrifice will keep her from terrorizing their town. But the witch in the forest, Xan, is kind and gentle. She shares her home with a wise Swamp Monster named Glerk and a Perfectly Tiny Dragon, Fyrian. Xan rescues the abandoned children and deliver them to welcoming families on the other side of the forest, nourishing the babies with starlight on the journey.

One year, Xan accidentally feeds a baby moonlight instead of starlight, filling the ordinary child with extraordinary magic. Xan decides she must raise this enmagicked girl, whom she calls Luna, as her own. To keep young Luna safe from her own unwieldy power, Xan locks her magic deep inside her. When Luna approaches her thirteenth birthday, her magic begins to emerge on schedule–but Xan is far away. Meanwhile, a young man from the Protectorate is determined to free his people by killing the witch. Soon, it is up to Luna to protect those who have protected her–even if it means the end of the loving, safe world she’s always known.

The acclaimed author of The Witch’s Boy has created another epic coming-of-age fairy tale destined to become a modern classic.

Enrique’s Journey: The True Story of a Boy Determined to Reunite with His Mother by Sonia Nazario
 
This is a tough book to read, not because it has difficult words or anything, but because it’s a tough topic.  It’s especially important right now with the anti-immigrant feelings and ideas being spoken in our country currently.  What would you do in Enrique’s situation? What would you do in Enrique’s mother’s situation.  This is the young reader’s version of the adult version Nazario wrote after hearing about Enrique’s story and then taking his journey herself.  You won’t be disappointed, and you might have a better understanding of what propels young and old to come to the United States.
Goodreads summary:
 
 An astonishing story that puts a human face on the ongoing debate about immigration reform in the United States, now updated with a new Epilogue and Afterword, photos of Enrique and his family, an author interview, and more—the definitive edition of a classic of contemporary America

 
Based on the Los Angeles Times newspaper series that won two Pulitzer Prizes, one for feature writing and another for feature photography, this page-turner about the power of family is a popular text in classrooms and a touchstone for communities across the country to engage in meaningful discussions about this essential American subject.

Enrique’s Journey recounts the unforgettable quest of a Honduran boy looking for his mother, eleven years after she is forced to leave her starving family to find work in the United States. Braving unimaginable peril, often clinging to the sides and tops of freight trains, Enrique travels through hostile worlds full of thugs, bandits, and corrupt cops. But he pushes forward, relying on his wit, courage, hope, and the kindness of strangers. As Isabel Allende writes: “This is a twenty-first-century Odyssey. If you are going to read only one nonfiction book this year, it has to be this one.”

First They Killed My Father: A Daughter of Cambodia Remembers by Loung Ung
 
There is no easy way to get around this.  This book is heartbreaking.  I knew a little about the war and genocide in Cambodia during the 1970s but not much. Ung’s personal story of destruction and then hope makes this a must-read for everyone. Warning: It can be graphic at times, but I truly believe that is important in understanding what Loung Ung and her family experienced. It breaks my heart that this time in world history is barely mentioned in American schools.
 
Goodreads summary (which doesn’t do the book justice): 
Chronicles the brutality of the Khmer Rouge in Cambodia, from the author’s forced ”evacuation” of Phnom Penh in 1975 to her family’s subsequent movements from town to town and eventual separation.

You can learn more about great books for middle school students and connect with Alison Sirovy here.

Advancement Via Individual Determination

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At North View Middle School we believe that providing challenging and relevant learning opportunities is the key to our students’ success in middle school and beyond. Because of this belief we are excited to offer an AVID exploratory course for 6th grade students next year.  The exploratory course is designed to support students who are in the academic middle on their path to college.  This course is an optional class that 6th grade students can apply to enter.  The AVID program will continue to support these students and prepare them for college as they move on through middle school and high school.  Key components of the AVID Elective course are:

  • Skill development in the areas of Writing, Inquiry, Collaboration, Organization, and Reading
  • Expectations of taking rigorous courses
  • The opportunity to be tutored by college mentors
  • Tutorial activities designed to support students with challenging classwork
  • Exposure to a college-going culture through guest speakers, college visits, college tutors, etc.

For more information, please visit www.avid.org, and feel free to reach out to Lara Woyno, school counselor, at 763-585-7213.

Literacy as a Gateway

Literacy (2)

 

At North View Middle School we recognize the fundamental importance of literacy to expanding life opportunities for our students. As a result of this understanding we work hard to ensure that literacy is alive in our building and in our student’s lives inside and outside of school.

In our building it is the expectation that all core teachers collaborate as a group of learners to ensure that each student achieves their greatest potential as readers and writers of the North View Middle School community. 

The English/Language Arts, Humanities, Science, and Full Service Special Ed teachers meet twice a week with our Literacy Coach and our Differentiation Coach for this work. Work is focused on Common Core literacy standards that are taught across content areas and how teachers can differentiate for the range of needs in their classroom. 

6th Grade – The 6th grade team spent trimester 2 focused on reading standard #6, point of view and author’s purpose.  During this cycle, students engaged in work around the standard by studying the authors and seeing how that shapes their writing in English class, reading about the different perspectives of current events in English class, how to look at the government and Minnesota history through different points of view in Humanities class, analyzing multiple articles for what the author’s purpose was in science class, and looking at how point of view and empathy are related in SEL class.  The post-assessment showed that many students could infer the author’s purpose and provide evidence to support their answers.  It also showed that students need to continue to practice being specific with their answers.  The team also spent time looking at individual students who are struggling and identified ways the team could support them.

6th/7th Grade – The 6/7 team also spent trimester 2 focused on standard #6, point of view and author’s purpose.  During this cycle, students engaged in work around author’s point of view and purpose through mini-debates about genetics in science class, literature circles in English class, and learning about the Civil Rights Movement by reading the book March and identifying how the different characters view the movement.  The 6/7 team will complete the post-assessment for standard 6 next week.  The team also spent time looking at individual students who are struggling and identified ways the team could support them.

7th Grade – The 7th grade team also spent trimester 2 focused on reading standard #6, author’s point of view and purpose.  During this cycle, students engaged in work around author’s point of view and purpose through mini-debates about genetics in science class, A Christmas Carol in ELA, and an enactment of a “dinner party” for World War II leaders during social studies.  The post-assessment showed that 80% of students were proficient on the standard.  The 7th grade team is beginning to work on argument writing by reading a portion of Kelly Gallagher’s book In the Best Interest of Students:  Staying True to What Works in the ELA Classroom.  The team is excited to provide students an opportunity to explore topics for true arguments of interest to them.

8th Grade –The team finished up the cycle on text features and the post assessment showed 64% of students were proficient.  Upon reflection of the post-assessment, the teachers didn’t feel it was written in a way that truly informed the teachers of the students’ understanding.  Based on how they see students interacting with text-features in class, they believe the proficient rate actually is higher.  The team spent time looking at individual students who are struggling with school and identified ways the team could support them.  They also spent time creating common expectations for student use of technology.  The team is now working on identifying arguments and evaluating the evidence and reasoning used to supporting the argument.  They will use the strategies from Non-Fiction Reading: Note & Notice Stances, Signposts, and Strategies by Kylene Beers to create common reading strategies across the content classes.

March Madness!

Hello All,

At North View Middle School(NVMS) we believe that actively engaging with text on a daily basis is key to building strong readers. To reinforce the enjoyment of reading, and continue to build a community of NVMS readers we instituted a “March Madness” reading experience for our students. To highlight the list of our school’s most checked out books and have a little fun, our building’s Library Media Specialist and Literacy Coach narrowed it down to 16 different titles, and 4 different genres

Using QR codes posted in the Media Center students voted for their favorite books. Between Feb. 29 and Mar. 4 students vote on “Sweet 16”. During the week of March 7th students voted on the “Elite 8”. We narrowed it down to the “Final 4” the week of March 14th and the week of March 28th the books went head to head for the final championship.

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March Madness Sweet 16 Bracket

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