The Chromebooks are Coming!!

 

Families,

The purpose of this communication is to make you aware of important information related to our upcoming student Chromebook distribution.

Deployment of Student Devices

Devices will be deployed to eighth grade students on Tuesday September 10th, seventh grade student on Wednesday September 11th, and sixth grade students on Thursday September 12th. Although the device is issued to a student, the device is, and remains, the property of Osseo Area Schools. The device may be reviewed by District personnel, or have access revoked at any time. The student should have no expectation of privacy regarding content on the device. The device is specifically assigned to a student and can only be activated with a valid District 279 username and password.

Device Management Procedures

Osseo Area Schools provides students with access to district technology resources for educational purposes. Students must adhere to all district policies including, but not limited to:

  • Technology and Internet Acceptable Use by Students (Policy 524),
  • Bullying Prohibition (Policy 514), and
  • Student Discipline (Policy 506).

Collection of Student Devices

Upon withdrawal from Osseo Area Schools, a student must return the device, and all accessories to their school’s media center. If the items are not returned, the student, and his/her parent/guardian will be billed the replacement cost. Failure to pay the replacement cost may result in action being taken by a collection agency.

All devices will be collected at the end of the school year. If a student fails to return the device and accessories (case, and charging cord), they will be assessed a replacement charge for the missing items. Device charges can be reversed following the return of the device to the school, and the device passing the inspection/processing by the district.

Device Repairs

Students will be assessed damage repair costs for all damages to the student’s assigned device. Any outstanding charges in relation to the device will result in the device being held in the media center until a minimum payment is made and a payment plan is set up, or the charge is paid in full.

Certain situations may require the full-payment of the device cost. These include:

  • Devices that are damaged beyond repair.
  • Devices that are stolen or lost due to negligence.
  • Device supplies that are stolen or lost due to negligence.
  • Intentional or reckless damage.
  • Tampering with the device or operating system. Students should not attempt to fix or repair hardware issues on the device.

Any incidents of damage, theft, or loss of a device must be reported to the School Media Center immediately. This includes cracked screens, even if the device is still usable. The District will track damages in its asset management system. Students who have had three damages with their assigned device will be required to have a meeting with the building administration. At four damages, a parent meeting will take place with the building administration.

Spares will be provided to a student on a per-case basis, as determined by the school. Students who have tampered with, or intentionally or recklessly damaged the device will not be issued a spare. Spare devices are assigned to the student, and will follow the same damage charge process as the assigned device.

If you have any questions about this or anything else related to North View Middle School please connect with me here or follow me at @NVMSPrincipal. 

Need a Good Book to Read?

At North View Middle School we believe that our students education does not end when the school bell rings. Because of this belief, I would like to use this post to recommend books for your middle level learner to engage with at home. Please read the information provided by Allison Sirovy, an 8th grade English teacher at North View Middle School, below to put a great book in your students hands.


July Reading Challenge – We Can Do Better!

Over and over, I see requests on social media for book recommendations, much like this one: “Help! I need book ideas for books for my 8th graders!”

And . . . time and time again, teachers (mind you, these are middle school and high school English teachers) share many of the same books. You know, the books that have been around for years, the books that have been taught for years, the books that we teachers love and can’t give up: The Outsiders, Hatchet, Island of the Blue Dolphins, Holes, To Kill a Mockingbird, The Catcher in the Rye, Lord of the Flies.

While I, too, love these books, we must do better for our students and expand our reading base, which means . . . WE, AS TEACHERS, MUST READ BOOKS that our middle school and high school students would find interesting. Books that are windows, mirrors, and sliding-glass doors for our students. We cannot say we are English teachers and not read. (We cannot say we are English teachers and not write either, but that is another post.)

July Challenge: Please read through the books below (or from any of my posts) and find one book that would be a “window” for you – a book that offers you a view into somebody else’s world.  If you are willing, please share what book you chose in the comments. When you are finished reading, tell us what you thought in the comments, share it on social media, and/or share with another teacher. Let’s spread the love of reading middle grade and YA books this summer with teachers! 

The books below are the order in which I have read them – oldest to most recent – since the end of May.

Opposite of Always by Justin A. Reynolds

Jack Ellison King. King of Almost.

He almost made valedictorian.

He almost made varsity.

He almost got the girl . . .

When Jack and Kate meet at a party, bonding until sunrise over their mutual love of Froot Loops and their favorite flicks, Jack knows he’s falling—hard. Soon she’s meeting his best friends, Jillian and Franny, and Kate wins them over as easily as she did Jack. Jack’s curse of almost is finally over.

But this love story is . . . complicated. It is an almost happily ever after. Because Kate dies. And their story should end there. Yet Kate’s death sends Jack back to the beginning, the moment they first meet, and Kate’s there again. Beautiful, radiant Kate. Healthy, happy, and charming as ever. Jack isn’t sure if he’s losing his mind. Still, if he has a chance to prevent Kate’s death, he’ll take it. Even if that means believing in time travel. However, Jack will learn that his actions are not without consequences. And when one choice turns deadly for someone else close to him, he has to figure out what he’s willing to do—and let go—to save the people he loves.

With the Fire on High by Elizabeth Acevedo 

With her daughter to care for and her abuela to help support, high school senior Emoni Santiago has to make the tough decisions, and do what must be done. The one place she can let her responsibilities go is in the kitchen, where she adds a little something magical to everything she cooks, turning her food into straight-up goodness. Still, she knows she doesn’t have enough time for her school’s new culinary arts class, doesn’t have the money for the class’s trip to Spain — and shouldn’t still be dreaming of someday working in a real kitchen. But even with all the rules she has for her life — and all the rules everyone expects her to play by — once Emoni starts cooking, her only real choice is to let her talent break free.

Does My Head Look Big in This? by Randa Abdel-Fattah

When sixteen-year-old Amal decides to wear the hijab full-time, her entire world changes, all because of a piece of cloth…

Sixteen-year-old Amal makes the decision to start wearing the hijab full-time and everyone has a reaction. Her parents, her teachers, her friends, people on the street. But she stands by her decision to embrace her faith and all that it is, even if it does make her a little different from everyone else.

Can she handle the taunts of “towel head,” the prejudice of her classmates, and still attract the cutest boy in school? Brilliantly funny and poignant, Randa Abdel-Fattah’s debut novel will strike a chord in all teenage readers, no matter what their beliefs.

Dream Country by Shannon Gibney 


The heartbreaking story of five generations of young people from a single African-and-American family pursuing an elusive dream of freedom.

The novel begins in suburban Minneapolis at the moment when seventeen-year-old Kollie Flomo begins to crack under the strain of his life as a Liberian refugee. He’s exhausted by being at once too black and not black enough for his African American peers and worn down by the expectations of his own Liberian family and community. When his frustration finally spills into violence and his parents send him back to Monrovia to reform school, the story shifts. Like Kollie, readers travel back to Liberia, but also back in time, to the early twentieth-century and the point of view of Togar Somah, an eighteen-year-old indigenous Liberian on the run from government militias that would force him to work the plantations of the Congo people, descendants of the African-American slaves who colonized Liberia almost a century earlier. When Togar’s section draws to a shocking close, the novel jumps again, back to America in 1827, to the children of Yasmine Wright, who leave a Virginia plantation with their mother for Liberia, where they’re promised freedom and a chance at self-determination by the American Colonization Society. The Wrights begin their section by fleeing the whip and by its close, they are then ones who wield it. With each new section, the novel uncovers fresh hope and resonating heartbreak, all based on historical fact.

In Dream Country, Shannon Gibney spins a riveting tale of the nightmarish spiral of death and exile connecting America and Africa, and of how one determined young dreamer tries to break free and gain control of her destiny.

Let Me Hear a Rhyme by Tiffany D. Jackson

In this standalone novel, Tiffany D. Jackson tells the story of three Brooklyn teens who plot to turn their murdered friend into a major rap star by pretending he is still alive.

Biggie Smalls was right. Things done changed. But that doesn’t mean that Quadir and Jarrell are okay letting their best friend Steph’s tracks lie forgotten in his bedroom after he’s killed—not when his beats could turn any Bed-Stuy corner into a celebration, not after years of having each other’s backs.

Enlisting the help of Steph’s younger sister, Jasmine, Quadir and Jarrell come up with a plan to promote Steph’s music under a new rap name: The Architect. Soon, everyone in Brooklyn is dancing to Steph’s voice. But then his mixtape catches the attention of a hotheaded music rep and—with just hours on the clock—the trio must race to prove Steph’s talent from beyond the grave.

Now, as the pressure—and danger—of keeping their secret grows, Quadir, Jarrell, and Jasmine are forced to confront the truth about what happened to Steph. Only each has something to hide. And with everything riding on Steph’s fame, together they need to decide what they stand for before they lose everything they’ve worked so hard to hold on to—including each other.

A Good Kind of Trouble by Lisa Ramee 


Twelve-year-old Shayla is allergic to trouble. All she wants to do is to follow the rules. (Oh, and she’d also like to make it through seventh grade with her best friendships intact, learn to run track, and have a cute boy see past her giant forehead.)

But in junior high, it’s like all the rules have changed. Now she’s suddenly questioning who her best friends are and some people at school are saying she’s not black enough. Wait, what?

Shay’s sister, Hana, is involved in Black Lives Matter, but Shay doesn’t think that’s for her. After experiencing a powerful protest, though, Shay decides some rules are worth breaking. She starts wearing an armband to school in support of the Black Lives movement. Soon everyone is taking sides. And she is given an ultimatum.

Shay is scared to do the wrong thing (and even more scared to do the right thing), but if she doesn’t face her fear, she’ll be forever tripping over the next hurdle. Now that’s trouble, for real.

Little Do We Know by Tamara Ireland Stone

Next-door neighbors and ex-best friends Hannah and Emory haven’t spoken in months. Not since the fight—the one where they said things they couldn’t take back.

Now, Emory is fine-tuning her UCLA performing arts application and trying to make the most of the months she has left with her boyfriend, Luke, before they head off to separate colleges. Meanwhile, Hannah’s strong faith is shaken when her family’s financial problems come to light, and she finds herself turning to unexpected places—and people—for answers to the difficult questions she’s suddenly facing.

No matter how much Hannah and Emory desperately want to bridge the thirty-six steps between their bedroom windows, they can’t. Not anymore.

Until their paths cross unexpectedly when, one night, Hannah finds Luke doubled over in his car outside her house. In the aftermath of the accident, all three struggle to understand what happened in their own ways. But when a devastating secret about Hannah and Emory’s argument ultimately comes to light, they must all reexamine the things they hold true.

In alternating chapters, a skeptic and a believer piece together the story of their complex relationship and the boy caught somewhere in the middle. New York Times best-selling author Tamara Ireland Stone deftly crafts a moving portrait of faith, love, and friendship.

Summer Bird Blue by Akemi Dawn Bowman 

Rumi Seto spends a lot of time worrying she doesn’t have the answers to everything. What to eat, where to go, whom to love. But there is one thing she is absolutely sure of—she wants to spend the rest of her life writing music with her younger sister, Lea.

Then Lea dies in a car accident, and her mother sends her away to live with her aunt in Hawaii while she deals with her own grief. Now thousands of miles from home, Rumi struggles to navigate the loss of her sister, being abandoned by her mother, and the absence of music in her life. With the help of the “boys next door”—a teenage surfer named Kai, who smiles too much and doesn’t take anything seriously, and an eighty-year-old named George Watanabe, who succumbed to his own grief years ago—Rumi attempts to find her way back to her music, to write the song she and Lea never had the chance to finish.

You can learn more about great books for middle school students and connect with Alison Sirovy here.

If you have any questions about this or anything else related to North View Middle School please connect with me here or follow me at @NVMSPrincipal. 

Need a Good Book to Read?

At North View Middle School we believe that our students education does not end when the school bell rings. Because of this belief, I would like to use this post to recommend books for your middle level learner to engage with at home. Please read the information provided by Allison Sirovy, an 8th grade English teacher at North View Middle School, below to put a great book in your students hands.


Summer Is Near!

Yikes! I’ve not written a post for a few months now. Last time I wrote, it was the middle of March and winter. As I write today, in the middle of May, it is winter-like in Minnesota – temps in the 30s, but no snow at least. Although today’s weather is not-so-great, the forecast improves quickly, and summer-like temps are coming back.

Summer is a time for me to re-charge, but it’s also a time when I worry about my students and all students – specifically, their reading lives. As the overwhelming majority of my eighth graders have embraced reading this school year, I worry that they will lose their love of reading. Technology is always on the forefront for my students, and the majority of American students, so I have to hope and pray that my students remember how they became engrossed in their books and didn’t want to put their books down when their stories got good.

To help keep students reading over the summer, please check out the following books that I’ve recently read and all of my blog posts for books that will entice your adolescent to read over the summer.

Happy Reading!

The Truth as Told by Mason Buttle by Leslie Connor 


Mason Buttle is the biggest, sweatiest kid in his grade, and everyone knows he can barely read or write. Mason’s learning disabilities are compounded by grief. Fifteen months ago, Mason’s best friend, Benny Kilmartin, turned up dead in the Buttle family’s orchard. An investigation drags on, and Mason, honest as the day is long, can’t understand why Lieutenant Baird won’t believe the story Mason has told about that day.

Both Mason and his new friend, tiny Calvin Chumsky, are relentlessly bullied by the other boys in their neighborhood, so they create an underground club space for themselves. When Calvin goes missing, Mason finds himself in trouble again. He’s desperate to figure out what happened to Calvin, and eventually, Benny.

But will anyone believe him?

Saints and Misfits by S. K. Ali

Saints and Misfits is an unforgettable debut novel that feels like a modern day My So-Called Life…starring a Muslim teen.

How much can you tell about a person just by looking at them?

Janna Yusuf knows a lot of people can’t figure out what to make of her…an Arab Indian-American hijabi teenager who is a Flannery O’Connor obsessed book nerd, aspiring photographer, and sometime graphic novelist is not exactly easy to put into a box.

And Janna suddenly finds herself caring what people think. Or at least what a certain boy named Jeremy thinks. Not that she would ever date him—Muslim girls don’t date. Or they shouldn’t date. Or won’t? Janna is still working all this out.

While her heart might be leading her in one direction, her mind is spinning in others. She is trying to decide what kind of person she wants to be, and what it means to be a saint, a misfit, or a monster. Except she knows a monster…one who happens to be parading around as a saint…Will she be the one to call him out on it? What will people in her tightknit Muslim community think of her then?

The Girl with More Than One Heart by Laura Geringer Bass 

There are times we all feel we need more than one heart to get through. When Briana’s father dies, she imagines she has a new heart growing inside her. It speaks to her in her Dad’s voice. Some of its commands are mysterious.

Find Her!  it says. Be Your Own!  

How can Briana “be her own” when her grieving mother needs her to take care of her demanding little brother all the time? When all her grandpa can do is tell stories instead of being the “rock” she needs? When her not-so-normal home life leaves no time to pursue her dream of writing for the school literary magazine? When the first blush of a new romance threatens to be nipped in the bud? Forced by the loss of her favorite parent to see all that was once familiar with new eyes, Briana draws on her own imagination, originality, and tender loving heart to discover a surprising path through the storm.

The Parker Inheritance by Varian Johnson

The letter waits in a book, in a box, in an attic, in an old house in Lambert, South Carolina. It’s waiting for Candice Miller.

When Candice finds the letter, she isn’t sure she should read it. It’s addressed to her grandmother, after all, who left Lambert in a cloud of shame. But the letter describes a young woman named Siobhan Washington. An injustice that happened decades ago. A mystery enfolding the letter-writer. And the fortune that awaits the person who solves the puzzle. Grandma tried and failed. But now Candice has another chance.

So with the help of Brandon Jones, the quiet boy across the street, she begins to decipher the clues in the letter. The challenge will lead them deep into Lambert’s history, full of ugly deeds, forgotten heroes, and one great love; and deeper into their own families, with their own unspoken secrets. Can they find the fortune and fulfill the letter’s promise before the summer ends?

Golden Boy by Tara Sullivan 


A shocking human rights tragedy brought to light in a story of heartbreak and triumph.

Thirteen-year-old Habo has always been different— light eyes, yellow hair and white skin. Not the good brown skin his family has and not the white skin of tourists. Habo is strange and alone. His father, unable to accept Habo, abandons the family; his mother can scarcely look at him. His brothers are cruel and the other children never invite him to play. Only his sister Asu loves him well. But even Asu can’t take the sting away when the family is forced from their small Tanzanian village, and Habo knows he is to blame.

Seeking refuge in Mwanza, Habo and his family journey across the Serengeti. His aunt is glad to open her home until she sees Habo for the first time, and then she is only afraid. Suddenly, Habo has a new word for himself: Albino. But they hunt Albinos in Mwanza because Albino body parts are thought to bring good luck. And soon Habo is being hunted by a fearsome man with a machete.

To survive, Habo must not only run but find a way to love and accept himself.

The Belles (The Belles #1) by Dhonielle Clayton

Camellia Beauregard is a Belle. In the opulent world of Orléans, Belles are revered, for they control Beauty, and Beauty is a commodity coveted above all else. In Orléans, the people are born gray, they are born damned, and only with the help of a Belle and her talents can they transform and be made beautiful.

But it’s not enough for Camellia to be just a Belle. She wants to be the favorite—the Belle chosen by the Queen of Orléans to live in the royal palace, to tend to the royal family and their court, to be recognized as the most talented Belle in the land. But once Camellia and her Belle sisters arrive at court, it becomes clear that being the favorite is not everything she always dreamed it would be. Behind the gilded palace walls live dark secrets, and Camellia soon learns that the very essence of her existence is a lie—that her powers are far greater, and could be more dangerous, than she ever imagined. And when the queen asks Camellia to risk her own life and help the ailing princess by using Belle powers in unintended ways, Camellia now faces an impossible decision.

With the future of Orléans and its people at stake, Camellia must decide—save herself and her sisters and the way of the Belles—or resuscitate the princess, risk her own life, and change the ways of her world forever.

Internment by Samira Ahmed 

Rebellions are built on hope.

Set in a horrifying near-future United States, seventeen-year-old Layla Amin and her parents are forced into an internment camp for Muslim American citizens.

With the help of newly made friends also trapped within the internment camp, her boyfriend on the outside, and an unexpected alliance, Layla begins a journey to fight for freedom, leading a revolution against the internment camp’s Director and his guards.

Heart-racing and emotional, Internment challenges readers to fight complicit silence that exists in our society today.

How to Make Friends with the Dark by Kathleen Glasgow


Here is what happens when your mother dies.

It’s the brightest day of summer and it’s dark outside. It’s dark in your house, dark in your room, and dark in your heart. You feel like the darkness is going to split you apart.

That’s how it feels for Tiger. It’s always been Tiger and her mother against the world. Then, on a day like any other, Tiger’s mother dies. And now it’s Tiger, alone.

Here is how you learn to make friends with the dark.

Dreambender by Ronald Kidd 


Everyone in the City is assigned a job by the choosers–keeper, catcher, computer. Callie Crawford is a computer. She works with numbers: putting them together, taking them apart. Her work is important, but sometimes she wants more. Jeremy Finn is a dreambender. His job is to adjust people’s dreams. He and others like him quietly remove thoughts of music and art to keep the people in the City from becoming too focused on themselves and their own feelings rather than on the world. They need to keep the world safe from another Warming. But Jeremy thinks music is beautiful, and when he pops into a dream of Callie singing, he becomes fascinated with her. He begins to wonder if there is more to life than being safe. Defying his community and the role they have established for him, he sets off to find her in the real world. Together, they will challenge their world’s expectations. But how far will they go to achieve their own dreams?

Dry by Neal Shusterman and Jarrod Shusterman

When the California drought escalates to catastrophic proportions, one teen is forced to make life and death decisions for her family in this harrowing story of survival from New York Times bestselling author Neal Shusterman and Jarrod Shusterman.

The drought—or the Tap-Out, as everyone calls it—has been going on for a while now. Everyone’s lives have become an endless list of don’ts: don’t water the lawn, don’t fill up your pool, don’t take long showers.

Until the taps run dry.

Suddenly, Alyssa’s quiet suburban street spirals into a warzone of desperation; neighbors and families turned against each other on the hunt for water. And when her parents don’t return and her life—and the life of her brother—is threatened, Alyssa has to make impossible choices if she’s going to survive.

No Fixed Address by Susan Nielsen 

From beloved Governor General Literary Award–winning author Susin Nielsen comes a touching and funny middle-grade story about family, friendship and growing up when you’re one step away from homelessness.

Felix Knuttson, twelve, is an endearing kid with an incredible brain for trivia. His mom Astrid is loving but unreliable; she can’t hold onto a job, or a home. When they lose their apartment in Vancouver, they move into a camper van, just for August, till Astrid finds a job. September comes, they’re still in the van; Felix must keep “home” a secret and give a fake address in order to enroll in school. Luckily, he finds true friends. As the weeks pass and life becomes grim, he struggles not to let anyone know how precarious his situation is. When he gets to compete on a national quiz show, Felix is determined to win — the cash prize will bring them a home. Their luck is about to change! But what happens is not at all what Felix expected.

Bronx Masquerade by Nikki Grimes


When Wesley Boone writes a poem for his high school English class, some of his classmates clamor to read their poems aloud too. Soon they’re having weekly poetry sessions and, one by one, the eighteen students are opening up and taking on the risky challenge of self-revelation. There’s Lupe Alvarin, desperate to have a baby so she will feel loved. Raynard Patterson, hiding a secret behind his silence. Porscha Johnson, needing an outlet for her anger after her mother OD’s. Through the poetry they share and narratives in which they reveal their most intimate thoughts about themselves and one another, their words and lives show what lies beneath the skin, behind the eyes, beyond the masquerade.

A Good Time for the Truth: Race in Minnesota edited by Sun Yung Shin 

Essays that challenge, discomfort, disorient, galvanize, and inspire all of us to evolve now, for our shared future.

FYI – This is an adult book, but I think 10th graders and up would also find this book an important read.

You can learn more about great books for middle school students and connect with Alison Sirovy here.

If you have any questions about this or anything else related to North View Middle School please connect with me here or follow me at @NVMSPrincipal. 

Advancement Via Individual Determination (AVID)

 

At North View Middle School we believe that providing challenging and relevant learning opportunities is the key to our students’ success in middle school and beyond. Because of this belief we are excited to offer an AVID exploratory course to our 6th, 7th, and 8th grade students next year.

1436483150

This exploratory course is designed to support students, who are in the academic middle, on their path to college.  This course is an optional class that students can apply to enter.  The AVID program will continue to support these students and prepare them for college as they move on through middle school, and high school.  Key components of our AVID course are:

  • Skill development in the areas of Writing, Inquiry, Collaboration, Organization, and Reading.
  • Expectations of taking rigorous courses.
  • The opportunity to be tutored by academic mentors.
  • Tutorial activities designed to support students with challenging course work.
  • Exposure to a college-going culture through guest speakers, college visits, college tutors, etc.

For more information, please visit WWW.AVID.ORG, and feel free to reach out to Anna Paulson, our AVID instructor.
If you have any questions about this or anything else related to North View Middle School please connect with me here or follow me at @NVMSPrincipal. 

A Spotlight On Math

 

At North View Middle School we believe that teaching and learning approaches should accommodate the diverse skills, abilities, and prior knowledge of young adolescents, cultivate multiple intelligences, draw upon students’ individual learning styles, and utilize digital tools. When learning experiences capitalize on students’ cultural, experiential, and personal backgrounds, new concepts are built on knowledge students already possess. To ensure this happens, we use the nature of young adolescents to guide our instructional decision making. Because of this belief, our teachers spend a considerable creating engaging learning opportunities.

Math teachers have been working diligently on developing curriculum for Trimester two. Students and families might notice some changes in math, specifically with homework. Seventh and eighth grade math classes will have homework assigned digitally in IXL, an online math program, which is to be completed weekly. Students are expected to complete the work assigned each week to support learning in the classroom. There is after school math help available to students who need extra support.

Our sixth grade math students will be doing explorations of area, surface area, and volume this trimester. Students will engage in math investigations that will allow them to develop deeper understanding of mathematical concepts in the real world. Students will:

  • Develop and use formulas for finding the area of triangles, quadrilaterals, and irregular shapes.
  • Understand the relationship between area and perimeter of figures.
  • Create solutions to problems involving surface area and volume of prisms.

Our seventh grade math students will be working on ratios, rates, graphs, tables and equations. Students will be engaged in a scenario to develop deeper understanding of the relationships between mathematical expressions. Students will be recruited as bloggers as they research and present findings related to different cars for our scenario. Students will:

 

  • Understand and be able to use unit rate and ratios to solve problems.
  • Create tables, graphs and equations to express data and develop conclusions.
  • Communicate findings and recommendations based on given data.

 


Our eighth grade math students will be working on linear algebra, forms of equations, and inequalities. Students will be engaged in a problem-based scenario where they will need to determine which pay scales are best for a given company. Students will:

 

  • Create and scale graphs to adequately show given information.
  • Use information to move between standard form, point-slope, and y-intercept forms of equations.
  • Express inequalities in both equation and graph form.
  • Communicate findings and recommendations.

Check out the video below to learn more about the Fortnite Challenge!

I hope you enjoyed this spotlight. If you have any questions about this or anything else related to North View Middle School please connect with me here or follow me at @NVMSPrincipal. 

 

A Spotlight on Science

 

At North View Middle School we believe that teaching and learning approaches should accommodate the diverse skills, abilities, and prior knowledge of young adolescents, cultivate multiple intelligences, draw upon students’ individual learning styles, and utilize digital tools. When learning experiences capitalize on students’ cultural, experiential, and personal backgrounds, new concepts are built on knowledge students already possess. To ensure this happens, we use the nature of young adolescents to guide our instructional decision making.

Because of this belief, our teachers spend a considerable creating engaging learning opportunities. These opportunities occur in all classes and today I would like to use this post to highlight science. The first unit of instruction I would like you to learn more about is from our sixth grade Science classrooms.

 

 Our students are in the fifth week of a five week unit covering “How do scientists conduct experiments?”. The key concepts studied are:

  • The Scientific Method is a way of conducting experiments?
  • How to measure using International System of Units?
  • How to collect and share data?

Our seventh grade students are in the second week of a three week unit covering “The Characteristics of Life”. The key concepts being studied are:

  • Explaining the six characteristics organisms must have to be considered “living” and determining if an organism is living based off of those characteristics.
  • Determining how scientists group all living things. What are the 5 kingdoms all living things fit into?
  • Comparing and contrasting living things. What characteristics do they share? What makes them different?

 

Lastly, our eighth grade students are in the third week of a four week unit covering, “Engineering and the Design process”. The key concepts being studied are:

  • How engineering and technology impact the changing world we live in.
  • What the design process is and how we use it.
  • How patterns and predictions impact the design process.
  • How our culture impacts our ideas.

I hope you enjoyed this spotlight. If you have any questions about this or anything else related to North View Middle School please connect with me here or follow me at @NVMSPrincipal. 

The iPads are Coming!!

Families,

The purpose of this communication is to make you aware of important information related to our upcoming student iPad distribution.

 Deployment of Student Devices

Devices will be deployed to your student on Tuesday September 25th, 2018. Prior to the deployment day, your student will be notified, and must address any previous outstanding charge that may have been accrued from previous school years. Addressing the charge will require that either the entire charge is paid in full, or at least 30% of the invoice is paid, and payment plan is worked out with the device management team.

Students who have not addressed the charge on deployment day may be required to keep their assigned device at school until payment has been made in full or payment plans have been established. While deployment for take-home use may be denied or limited, students will not be denied access to educational services or curriculum because of outstanding charges. Upon initial deployment, all students are issued a case, cable, and charger. If there is damage or loss to the case, cable or charger after the initial distribution, students will be held financially responsible.

Device Management Procedures

Osseo Area Schools provides students with access to district technology resources for educational purposes. Students must adhere to all district policies including, but not limited to:

  • Technology and Internet Acceptable Use by Students (Policy 524),
  • Bullying Prohibition (Policy 514), and
  • Student Discipline (Policy 506).

Although the device is issued to a student, the device is and remains the property of Osseo Area Schools. The device may be reviewed by District personnel, or have access revoked at any time. The student should have no expectation of privacy regarding content on the device. The device is specifically assigned to a student and can only be activated with a valid District 279 username and password.

Collection of Student Devices

Upon withdrawal from Osseo Area Schools, a student must return the device, and all accessories to their school’s media center. If the items are not returned, the student, and his/her parent/guardian will be billed the replacement cost. Failure to pay the replacement cost may result in action being taken by a collection agency.

All devices will be collected at the end of the school year. If a student fails to return the device and accessories (case, cord, and charging block), they will be assessed a replacement charge for the missing items. Device charges can be reversed following the return of the device to the school, and the device passing the inspection/processing by the district.

Device Repairs

Students will be assessed damage repair costs for all damages to the student’s assigned device. Any outstanding charges in relation to the device will result in the device being held in the media center until a minimum payment is made and a payment plan is set up, or the charge is paid in full.

Certain situations may require the full-payment of the device cost. These include:

  • Devices that are damaged beyond repair.
  • Devices that are stolen or lost due to negligence.
  • Device supplies that are stolen or lost due to negligence.
  • Intentional or reckless damage.
  • Tampering with the device or operating system. Students should not attempt to fix or repair hardware issues on the device.

Any incidents of damage, theft, or loss of a device must be reported to the School Media Center immediately. This includes cracked screens, even if the device is still usable. The District will track damages in its asset management system. Students who have had three damages with their assigned device will be required to have a meeting with the building administration. At four damages, a parent meeting will take place with the building administration. The District reserves the right to modify charges based upon a parent’s active military service or inability to pay.

Spares will be provided to a student on a per-case basis, as determined by the school. Students who have tampered with, or intentionally or recklessly damaged the device will not be issued a spare. Spare devices are assigned to the student, and will follow the same damage charge process as the assigned device.

 2018-2019 Estimated Repair/ Replacement Costs

Outlined below are the estimated costs for the repair or replacement of the device

  • Full device replacement $451
  • Case replacement $35
  • Cable replacement $12
  • Charger replacement $16
  • Battery replacement $109
  • Screen damage $109
  • Mainboard damage $109

Note: These costs are an estimate based on current price of parts. Actual cost may vary based on the nature of the damage, and the actual cost of replacement parts.

If you have any questions about this or anything else related to North View Middle School please connect with me here or follow me at @NVMSPrincipal.